Nursing and waitressing

I waited tables and bartended to pay my way through nursing school. I remember thinking, during particularly busy dinner shifts with customers who were high maintenance or angry or demanding or just determined to be unsatisfied, that things would become SO much better when I graduated from nursing school and became a real nurse. NOBODY would order me around, treat me like a servant, talk down to me, attempt to make me feel inferior or repeatedly send me back to the supply area for extra condiments. NOBODY! I would be the EXPERT! I would have POWER! (that I would wield responsibly of course…)

Surprise! Ten years later…I get ordered around, treated like a servant, talked down to, attempted to be made to feel inferior, and repeatedly sent back to the supply room for extra condiments. Except the condiments are drugs. Lots of ’em.

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Pronunciation & slang

One pet peeve of mine is mispronunciation of medication names.  And unnecessary slang usage.  From both patient and provider.

As a provider, I think it is essential that we be able to pronounce medications properly.  Yes, there are a lot of medications with tongue twisting names, but every medication reference book has some sort of dummy instructions (pro-pee-sha, vie-ah-gruh).  Besides…how confidence inspiring is it to have your nurse butchering the names of the medications he/she is giving you? Not at all.

I mean, if my barista called out my caramel macchiato as “care-mall match-ee-ay-tow”  as opposed to “car-mul mach-ee-ah-toe” I’m pretty sure I’d think they were on their second day of barista training and that if they can’t pronounce it, how can they possibly create it?  And that’s okay really, because caramel macchiatos can’t kill you.  But carvedilol maybe can, or digoxin, or lorazepam.

And slang.  Oh slang.  Just as I don’t walk up to my barista and order a “cuppa joe” or “jet fuel” or “mommy’s milk”, I refuse to be asked for “oxy”.  We’re not on the streets here.  I’m not selling it to you.  I’m administering it.  So call it by its proper name, thank you.

The Devil Wears…Danskos?

The devil doesn’t wear Prada on my unit….he wears old worn out brown Danskos.  Danskos that I wish he would replace, STAT.  He’s our bigwig surgeon.  Dr. X.  He’s arrogant, he’s charming with the lady patients, he’s published like a gazillion papers in peer reviewed journals, he has impeccable outcome statistics and he has expectations of perfection that only Mother Theresa could meet.  But his Danskos? He’s had to have had those things since residency, which must have been ages ago.  They probably smell horrid, like a combination of dog anal glands and epoisses on a hot day.   A lot of surgeons have their “thing”.  A little superstition.  A certain surgical cap, a Mont Blanc fountain pen they’ve used for every paper order and progress note since the 70’s, their alma mater pin etc.

This guy? His ratty brown Danskos.  Now, don’t get me wrong.  I have a love/hate relationship with my Danskos.  I fought the good fight to avoid buying a pair until my aching feet protested after a year of 12 hour shifts.  I caved.  I bought.  I hate.  They’re so ugly!  But they’re SO comfortable.  And the 1 3/4″ heel comes in mighty handy when you have to walk to work in the rain.

When Dr. X breezes onto the floor for rounds, you can see him coming down the hall with his entourage of 4-5 residents, a few interns and perhaps a terrified medical student trailing 4 feet behind.  They flank him like a flock of geese migrating south in  V formation.  And every time I find myself humming “My Posse’s on Broadway” when they walk by.  Usually we’ve had about 23 seconds of lead time before he arrives to round on his patients because his Danskos have a certain recognizable squeak.

You know the scene from The Devil Wears Prada where Meryl Streep’s character is making her way into the building for work?  Scenes of her getting out of her town car, entering the building, getting in the elevators and opening the big glass doors to the fashion magazine headquarters are interspersed with scenes of frantic fashion magazine employees racing around making sure everything is perfect in the office before she arrives.  Cleaning up clutter, touching up their makeup, changing out of comfortable shoes into high stilettos, hiding carbs, taking off functional clothes and putting on haute couture, setting her coffee in its exact proper location on her desk.

That’s what its like when Dr. X comes on the floor.  We race around making sure all his patients are awake, out of bed (“get up now! get in the chair!”), medicated, working on their pulmonary hygiene (“If anyone asks you’ve been doing this incentive spirometry all morning!”)* or…jackpot…just happen to be walking in the hall when he arrives (which he loves).  If they’re asleep and shaking them awake wouldn’t be appropriate, we just shove the incentive spirometer into their limp hands. **

And he buys it every time.

* We normally do all these important post operative nursing interventions anyway.  Many times a day. We’re good nurses.  He just rounds so early in the morning before we’ve had a chance to get everyone going.

** I’ve totally done that before

The surgeon seamstress

The day after Halloween, while my Facebook feed was being flooded by parents posting pictures of their children in costume, I was at work discussing with my friend various tactics for deterring trick or treaters from my front door.  I obviously don’t have children.  And the doorbell scares my cat.  And I don’t appreciate begging, extortion and gluttony, which is basically what trick or treating is.  But I do love a good costume.

So our discussion turned to costumes and the various guises we had inhabited on Halloween throughout our childhoods.  Many of mine had dark and morbid undertones with lots of fake blood and fangs and black fabric.  One year I had a momentary lapse when my mother sewed a sparkly “good witch” costume.  My friend (who is 6’1″ and about 250lbs) was an Oompa Loompa every year.  Our discussion peaked the interest of one of our plastic/reconstructive surgeons who was dictating nearby.  He said his daughter had wanted to be Voldemort that year.  Not Hermoine, but Voldemort.  I liked her immediately.

Now, I like to entertain the notion that I am impervious to gender stereotypes, but when he proceeded to described in great detail the elaborate robe which he sewed for his daughter’s costume, I was at first skeptical.  Yeah right…you sewed your daughter’s entire costume.  Snort.  But then he showed us pictures on his phone.  And it was gorgeous.

And then I realized…he sews skin better than Buffalo Bill.  So naturally he can sew an elaborate wizard costume.  Naturally.